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The Beginning Of My Ascendance
April 22nd, 2007
10:59 am

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My Sister, Nicole Vienneau, Has Gone Missing in Syria

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From:(Anonymous)
Date:November 17th, 2007 08:00 am (UTC)

Serial killer from 2004

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Well this is probably of no use but I thought I would post it. In addition to this, I remember reading somewhere about a serial killer in the hama area who targeted women with long brown hair (um, that is most of syria). Anyway, here is the bit from 2004. http://lonehighlander.blogspot.com/2004_08_01_archive.html

Like most Arab countries (apart from Saudi Arabia following the ‘liberation’ of Iraq) Syria is extremely safe. Where in the West can a woman go out wearing a lot of jewelry and not be bothered? I never felt and outsider, in fact that is the trademark of Arab countries, even in huge, sprawling Cairo or shaky Beirut I felt safe with my gold and diamonds and stuff. I really want to stress this safety part, because upon my arrival in late June, many of my friends warned me that I should drop the jewels and stop going out alone as women have been targeted and knifed lately, a group or one person it was rumoured was knifing them. I was devastated, if the legendary safety of women in one of my favourite part of the world was blown away then all was lost. There were many rumours and hearsay that first week: it was some thugs who had crossed the border from Iraq and they were forming gangs and targeting unveiled women, a fundamentalist group and many other stories. But the problem was that a woman with full hijab was also a victim, so what were we to believe? In fact the only common denominator between the victims was the fact that they were females, it did not matter weather they were blondes or brunettes, veiled or not, young or old. There was a serial killer on the loose and it was one person not a gang and he was using exactly the same method of attack. I did not really bother about the warning and one evening I went to visit some family friends at one of the Palestinian camps (I’ll talk about these in another post). I was telling them how I was disappointed about this safety situation, Damascus is one of the bastions of women safety for me I never felt this safe in Rome for example. My friends showed me that day’s newspaper, which I had failed to read, in which it was reported that the serial killer was apprehended and he was a young disturbed man who after being rejected by his fiancée had carried a grudge about women and was avenging his wounded ego in this way (such crimes are also common in the West right ? I read about them always in the popular dailies). Anyway the attacks stopped and my treasured safety was back, it was a false alarm, no rise of fundamentalism (that had been crushed 2 decades ago) and no Iraqi thugs (although I will talk about the Iraqi border another time also).
From:(Anonymous)
Date:November 17th, 2007 09:18 am (UTC)

Re: Serial killer from 2004

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It's true that the area isn't as safe as it used to be.
I think that there is a limited amount one can do sitting behind a computer in North America, and it seems it has been mostly done at this point.
Perhaps, though, it might be helpful to go to Syria and visit the mosques in the Hama area (all the mosques if possible), asking the Imams to appeal to their congregations for information. Not just anyone who saw anything, but anyone who heard or suspects anything.
The Imams might not post a picture in their mosques, but there should be enough missing posters around that anyone can see them.
Probably an anonymous post office box and, possibly, an anonymous mobile phone number would be best in this case. Everyone in Syria knows the internet is monitored there.
The appeal would be best made by relatives, like a brother and mother. The concept of a long-time partner to whom one is not married is rather incompehensible to many observant Muslims, although the concept of fiance is not.
I wish you the best.
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